AUSTRALIE : Rapports récents autour de l’éducation, de l’apprentissage des langues et de l’enseignement supérieur

Le 18 Septembre 2012, était annoncée la parution du 3ème volet  d’un rapport intitulé « Footprints In Time » – The Longitudinal Study Of Indigenous Children (LSIC)– Une étude à l’initiative du gouvernement australien,  plus précisément du Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA). Le comité de pilotage du projet est presidé par Mick Dodson. Cette étude vise à accroître la compréhension des questions relatives aux enfants aborigènes et du détroit de Torrès et les politiques les concernant. <Télécharger le rapport>

Un autre rapport intitulé “The Review of Higher Education Access and Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peopleannoncé le 17 septembre 2012, abordait, quant à lui les questions de l’accès à l’enseignement supérieur. <Télécharger le rapport>

Enfin, le Standing Committee on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs de la Chambre des Représentants remettait un rapport intitule « Our Land Our Languages », à l’issue d’une enquête consacrée à l’apprentissage des langues dans les communautés aborigènes, Le 17 septembre 2012. <Télécharger le rapport>

PLUS D’INFORMATIONS SUR LES DIFFERENTS RAPPORTS (ENG)

FOOTPRINTS IN TIME

The importance of education and early childhood learning to Indigenous families is a key finding of a landmark study of Indigenous children – Footprints in Time.

Footprints in Time tracks the long-term development of more than 1400 Indigenous children in 11 different communities, along with their parents and carers.

Findings from the study’s third wave, released today, shows encouraging results in educational outcomes for Indigenous children, reflecting the Australian Government’s unprecedented investment in early childhood services to help close the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

About 87 per cent of children surveyed said they find school enjoyable, with most saying they enjoy practising their reading, writing and maths. The study finds most primary carers are involved in their child’s education, helping with homework or other learning activities.

The study also indicates that children who attend preschool or childcare have more developed reading and writing skills, and are better prepared for school. This further highlights the importance of the Government’s Closing the Gap target of ensuring access to early childhood education for all Indigenous four year olds in remote communities within five years.

Since 2008, two cohorts of Indigenous children aged between six months and five years have been monitored, studying critical factors that influence the early development of Indigenous children.

Many Indigenous mothers surveyed see education as an essential part of giving their child the best possible start in life. When discussing aspirations for their children, a good education was the most common response.

Most mothers want their child to finish high school or continue into higher education, with many saying that a good education meant their child could get a good job, and would not have to rely on Government benefits.

The study also found that families had positive views of income management. Of the respondents who were affected by income management, 73 per cent said it was ‘very good’ or ‘good’ for their families, and 65 per cent said they thought income management had brought positive changes to their communities.

The Australian Government provides $3 million each year to support the Footprints in Time study, which is an important part of the Government’s Indigenous Early Childhood package.

Since 2008 governments have committed unprecedented investments to help close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage, including $564.4 million over six years under the National Partnership Agreements on Indigenous Early Childhood Development.

 Source: Minister for Families, Community Services, and Indigenous Affairs – Communiqué de presse 18/9/2012

THE REVIEW OF HIGHER EDUCATION ACCESS AND OUTCOMES FOR ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLE

A report released  has outlined a comprehensive roadmap to break down the barriers faced by Indigenous students to university education and create a new generation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander professionals.

The Review of Higher Education Access and Outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People was commissioned to drive real change in equity, parity and participation at universities.                            

   Launching the report today, Minister for Tertiary Education, Senator Chris Evans, said the Government will use the review as a roadmap to work with universities to further improve access and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

« International experience shows us that producing more Indigenous graduates, qualified to take up professional and leadership roles in business and government, will help address disadvantage in the Indigenous community, » Senator Evans said.                    

« The Government is committed to providing all Indigenous students who have the ability and commitment the opportunity to achieve professional qualifications.
« A university education has the power to break down barriers and empower Indigenous people to take leading roles in their professions.                                                                    

« While the number of Indigenous students commencing university has risen by 37 per cent, the Government is committed to further breaking down barriers to education.
« We have Indigenous students with ability and ambition and we have university programs that work. We must now extend the reach of successful programs across the university system and into the professions. »                                                                              

The Chair of the review, Professor Larissa Behrendt, said improving outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in higher education benefits everyone .
« It’s a win-win situation, » Professor Behrendt said.                                                                   

« We know individuals benefit through increased health, education and economic outcomes.

« We know communities benefit from increased expertise, role models and leadership. »
Senator Evans said the Government will work in partnership with universities and professional bodies to life the number of Indigenous engineers, doctors, lawyers, nurses and teachers.

« Boosting the number of Indigenous students at university is a key component of the Government’s ambition to close the gap, » Senator Evans said.

« Attaining parity in Indigenous higher education participation across a range of disciplines for students, staff and researchers is the next step in driving lasting reform. »
The report recommends increasing the number of Indigenous students and staff at universities to 2.2 per cent; the parity rate of the population of working age Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

« In order to achieve this outcome, we must work together to almost double the number of Indigenous students attending our nation’s universities, » Senator Evans said.
« This is a critical and achievable goal. »

Source: Minister for Tertiary EducationCommuniqué de presse en date du 14/9/2012

AUSTRALIA : OUR LAND OUR LANGUAGES – LANGUAGES LEARNING IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES

List of recommendations :

2) The role of Indigenous languages
Recommendation 1 – Closing the Gap framework
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government include in the Closing the Gap framework acknowledgement of the fundamental role and importance of Indigenous languages in preserving heritage and improving outcomes for Indigenous peoples.
Recommendation 2 – Signage in Indigenous languages
The Committee recommends the Commonwealth Government include in the National Indigenous Languages Policy 2009 a commitment to support and progress signage of place names and landmarks in local Indigenous languages.
Recommendation 3 – Parliamentary recognition of Indigenous languages
The Committee recommends the Commonwealth Parliament demonstrate leadership in the recognition and valuing of Indigenous languages by:

  • considering how to incorporate Indigenous languages in the Parliament House building and in the operations of the Parliament, and
  • encouraging all Members of Parliament to:

⇒ be aware of and recognise the Indigenous language groups local to their electorate

⇒ where, possible and appropriate, acknowledge traditional owners and utilise language names for places and landmarks, and

⇒ support schools and community groups in their area to recognise, value and where possible utilise Indigenous language names.
3)  Indigenous languages policy
Recommendation 4 – Languages policy action plan
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government review and make publically available by March 2013 an updated action plan with clear goals, accountability and reporting requirements to implement its National Indigenous Languages Policy. The Committee further recommends that relevant Commonwealth Government agencies are required to report annually on outcomes of the action plan.
Recommendation 5 – Increased funding for Indigenous Languages Support
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government substantially increase ongoing funding for the Indigenous Languages Support program in the 2013-14 Budget.
Recommendation 6 – Torres Strait Islander funding eligibilityThe Committee recommends that the Minister for the Arts amend the guidelines for the Indigenous Languages Support program to allow Torres Strait Islander applications to be considered for funding.
Recommendation 7 – Deductible Gift Recipient eligibility
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government immediately amend the criteria for an organisation to be entered on the Register of Cultural Organisations to include a provision for Indigenous language-related projects to be endorsed as a Deductable Gift Recipient by the Australian Taxation Office.
Recommendation 8 – Constitutional recognition of Indigenous languages
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government support Constitutional changes to include the recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages, as recommended by the Expert Panel on Constitutional Recognition for Indigenous Australians.
Recommendation 9 – United Nations declaration implementation plan
The Committee recommends that by March 2013 the Commonwealth Government develop and announce an implementation plan given its endorsement of the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2009.
Recommendation 10 – Convention ratification review
The Committee recommends that, given Australia has not yet ratified the Convention for Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, the Commonwealth Government conduct a review of the potential benefits and implications of its ratification.
4) Learning Indigenous languages and Standard Australian English
Recommendation 11 – Indigenous language learning in school
The Committee recommends the Commonwealth Government coordinate with the states and territories to announce dates for the implementation of Phase 2 of the Australian Curriculum.
Recommendation 12 – Language Nests
The Committee recommends that the Office for the Arts, through the Indigenous Languages Support (ILS) program, prioritise funding for Language Nest programs throughout Australia.
The Committee further recommends that the Commonwealth Government give consideration to establishing Language Nest programs in early childhood learning centres and preschools as set up under National Partnership Agreements.
Recommendation 13 – First language assessment
The Committee recommends that the Minister for Education work through the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood to develop protocols for mandatory first-language assessment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children entering early childhood education.
Recommendation 14 – Bilingual education programs
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government work with state and territory governments to provide adequately resourced bilingual school education programs for Indigenous communities from the earliest years of learning, where the child’s first language is an Indigenous language (traditional or contact).
Recommendation 15 – NAPLAN alternative assessment tool
The Committee recommends that the Minister for Education work through the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood to develop a National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) alternative assessment tool for all students learning English as an Additional Language/Dialect.
5)  Teaching Indigenous languages
Recommendation 16 – Limited authority to teach
The Committee recommends the Minister for Education work through the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood and teacher training authorities to develop a national framework of flexible and accessible training for Indigenous people to gain limited authority qualifications to teach.
Recommendation 17 – Indigenous language teacher training
The Committee recommends the Minister for Education work through the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood to develop incentives for teacher training institutions to offer Indigenous language teacher training, such as a limited authority qualification to teach.
Recommendation 18 – Indigenous language teachers – training and career pathways
The Committee recommends that the Minister for Education work through the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood to develop strategies for training Indigenous language teachers to improve access to qualifications, full accreditation and career pathways as well as providing school support and mentorship where required.
Recommendation 19 – Master-apprentice schemes
The Committee recommends that the Minister for Education work through the Standing Council on School Education and Early Childhood to give consideration to establishing master-apprentice schemes in schools to provide in-service support for Indigenous language teachers.
Recommendation 20 – Sharing language teaching resources
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government amend the Indigenous Language Support (ILS) program funding criteria to ensure that language materials produced with ILS program support should, where practical and culturally appropriate, be available to be shared with schools and educational institutions as a teaching resource, with proper acknowledgment of its creators.
Recommendation 21 – Compulsory EAL/D training for teaching degrees
The Committee recommends the Minister for Education take to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) a proposal to include a compulsory component of English as an Additional Language or Dialect (EAL/D) training for all teaching degrees.
Recommendation 22 – In-service EAL/D and cultural awareness training
The Committee recommends the Minister for Education take to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) a proposal that all teachers already working in schools in Indigenous communities be required to complete in-service EAL/D and cultural awareness training as part of mandatory professional development.
6) Interpreting and translating Indigenous languages
Recommendation 23 – Protocol on the use of Indigenous interpreting services
The Committee recommends that the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs expedite the release of a protocol on the use of Indigenous interpreting services for all Commonwealth Government agencies. The Committee further recommends that the Commonwealth Government raise at Council of Australian Governments (COAG) the need for all states and territories to have similar protocols and ensure the use of competent interpreters when required.
Recommendation 24 – National Indigenous Interpreter Service
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government, in partnership with the states and territories, establish a national Indigenous interpreter service that is suitably resourced to service urban, regional and remote Australia.
Recommendation 25 –Interpreting in health and justice sectors
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government put in place immediate measures to ensure access to Indigenous interpreting services in the health and justice sectors, while a competent and comprehensive interpreting service is being developed.
Recommendation 26 – Interpreter training
The Committee recommends the Commonwealth Government, as part of developing the national framework for the effective supply and use of competent Indigenous language interpreters and translators, allocate resourcing to provide Indigenous interpreters with accessible training to achieve paraprofessional and professional levels.
Recommendation 27 – Accreditation funding
The Committee recommends the Commonwealth Government, in partnership with the state and territory governments, ensure dedicated and ongoing funding to the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) for Indigenous language interpreter accreditation to paraprofessional and professional level.
7)  Preserving languages for future generations
Recommendation 28 – Dedicated Indigenous language archive
The Committee recommends that the Commonwealth Government include in the 2013-14 Budget increased resources for the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies to carry out the storage and digitisation of Indigenous language materials.

Recommendation 29 – AIATSIS research funding
The Committee recommends the Commonwealth Government consult with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies to determine an appropriate and sustainable funding model in order for it to recommence its research grants program in the 2013-14 Budget.
Recommendation 30 – Archiving of ILS language material
The Committee recommends that the Indigenous Languages Support (ILS) program funding guidelines be amended to include a stipulation that a copy of any language materials developed by ILS funding recipients must be deposited with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies’ Library or Audio-Visual Archive.

Source : House of Representatives Committees, publié dans le site Indigenous Peoples and Issues.

 

 

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